GLUTEN FREE DIET

 

If you eat gluten-free, a gluten-free foods list can be a valuable resource. Navigating stores and restaurants to find gluten-free food options may be challenging at times. This gluten-free foods list can help you know what to look for (and what to look out for) when choosing grains and other foods that may contain gluten.

Currently, using a “gluten-free” label is optional on food products sold in the U.S. All products that are labeled “gluten-free” must contain less than 20 parts per million gluten. The 20 ppm threshold was set because it is virtually impossible to reliably detect levels below this (it’s like finding a grain of sand in a swimming pool). Plus, research shows that most people with celiac disease, an immune response to eating gluten, can handle these small (<20 ppm) amounts of gluten with no ill effects.

All food labeled “gluten-free” meets these standards, but not all gluten-free food is labeled (especially products that are naturally gluten-free). The ingredient list on the package label is your best tool to be sure, and you can always contact the food company directly if you’re unclear. Here are some things to look out for when you’re buying gluten-free foods.

Gluten-Free Whole Grains: Oats, Cereals, Breads and More

Grains (including bread, pasta, rice, crackers), specifically whole grains, are an important part of a healthy diet. Whole grains are a good source of healthy carbohydrates, providing energy to get you through the day. Most whole grains are high in fiber, which keeps you full and helps with digestion. Though many grains have gluten, a wide variety are naturally gluten-free.

Naturally Gluten-Free Grains & Starches:

  • Rice
    • Quinoa
    • Millet
    • Oats: But be aware that oats may be processed in a facility that also processes wheat. You’ll need to confirm your oats are labeled gluten-free or check with the manufacturer to rule out cross-contamination.
    • Cassava/Yuca
    • Sorghum
    • Teff
    • Corn
    • Buckwheat
    • Amaranth
    • Potatoes and potato flour

What to Avoid When Shopping for Grains:

If you’re not sure if your bread, crackers, pasta and other grain-based products are gluten-free, a quick look through the ingredients can help you tell. Avoid products that contain any of the following, as these are NOT gluten-free.

  • Wheat
    • Other forms/varieties of wheat that should also be avoided: whole wheat, spelt, wheat berries, kamut, durum, farro, farina, bulgur, graham, semolina, bromated flour • Barley
    • Rye
    • Triticale (a cross between rye and wheat)
    • Malt

 

Gluten-Free Vegetables & Fruits

 

That’s right, gluten can even sneak into some of your fruits and veggies, though this is no reason to avoid them! All fresh, whole vegetables and fruits are naturally gluten-free and important to include in a gluten-free diet. Low in calories, fat and sodium and delivering a variety of vitamins and minerals, fruits and vegetables are a great source of antioxidants. Produce is also a top source of fiber, which can help lower cholesterol and keep you full.

But when you move out of the produce aisle and start looking at packaged produce, be wary. Some types of processed vegetables and fruits may be prepared or preserved with ingredients that contain gluten. Plain fresh and frozen (without sauce) vegetables are all gluten-free, but double-check ingredient lists on packages to be sure. When buying canned veggies, buy those packed with water or natural juices (typically the healthier option anyway). For dried and pre-prepped vegetables, double-check the ingredients to make sure there are no gluten-containing flavorings or stabilizers. The concern for gluten in fruit comes when fruit is canned, dried or (less likely but possible) frozen, as gluten-containing ingredients may be added during the process. Here’s what to look out for when selecting gluten-free fruit and vegetables.

What to Avoid When Shopping for Fruits and Vegetables:

  • Hydrolyzed wheat protein
    • Modified food starch: If the label doesn’t specify what type of starch is used, check with the manufacturer, as it may be wheat.
    • Malt: Including malt syrup, malt vinegar, malt extract, malt flavoring
    • Gluten stabilizer
    • Maltodextrin: This is OK when made from corn, potato or rice starch. If it’s made from wheat, it will be labeled: you may have a reaction, though many claim the gluten is destroyed in processing.

Safe Ingredients:

  • Cornstarch
    • Potato starch/potato starch flour
    • Distilled vinegar
    • Mono- and diglycerides
    • Oat gum
    • Citric acid, lactic acid and malic acid

Gluten-Free Proteins

 

Most protein sources—both animal and vegetable proteins—are naturally gluten-free. Additional ingredients, such as fillers and flavor enhancers (including spices, rubs and sauces) are where gluten can sneak into your meats and veggie proteins. Use this list to help you decide which proteins can fit into a gluten-free diet.

Naturally Gluten-Free Proteins:

  • Red meat: Fresh beef, pork, lamb, goat, bison, duck, etc. (Check any marinades.)
    • Poultry: Fresh chicken and turkey (Check any marinades.)
    • Seafood: Fresh fish, scallops, lobster, clams and more are all naturally gluten-free. (Check any marinades.)
    • Tofu: It’s made from soy, which is gluten-free, but check for any additional ingredients with gluten.
    • Beans
    • Nuts and seeds

Proteins That Need a Second Look:

  • Processed meats: Including hot dogs, pepperoni, sausage, etc. These may have gluten added, so be sure to check the ingredient list and avoid those with wheat gluten, wheat starch or wheat dextrin.
    • Cold cuts: It’s rare, but cold cuts may have gluten-containing ingredients added; cross-contamination can also happen at the deli on the meat slicer.
    • Ground meat: Ground beef or ground turkey can have gluten added in as filler. Be sure to check the ingredients carefully.
    • Vegetarian burgers and other meat substitutes: Some flavors and brands are made with ingredients that contain gluten. Be sure to check the labels.

Proteins to Avoid:

 

  • Seitan: This vegetarian protein is literally gluten. So avoid this if you’re following a gluten-free diet.

Don’t Miss:

Gluten-Free Sauces, Spices and Condiments

Sauces are one of the most common places gluten slips in unnoticed. Gluten-containing ingredients can be used as thickeners, stabilizers or flavor enhancers in many common condiments. Wheat flour is a common thickener in many sauces and marinades, which means they contain gluten. Be aware of the following sources of gluten that may not be super-obvious. And also watch out for cross-contamination once these items are in your home. For example, a knife used to spread mustard on wheat bread shouldn’t be dipped back into the mustard jar if you want it to stay gluten-free.

Sauces, Spices and Condiments That Are Usually Safe:

  • Mustard: Some specialty or flavored mustards may contain gluten, so always check the ingredients.
    • Mayonnaise: Typically not made with gluten, but check the ingredients to be sure.
    • Dry spices: Most single-ingredient herbs and spices (think dried basil, garlic powder, chili powder) do not contain gluten, though because of cross-contamination concerns it’s best to look for specifically labeled gluten-free spices or check with the manufacturer.

Sauces, Spices and Condiments That Need a Second Look:

  • Ketchup and Worcestershire sauce: Both of these condiments can be made using malt vinegar, which is not gluten-free. Double-check the ingredients.
    • Barbecue sauce: Avoid BBQ sauces made with barley-based beer, soy sauce, malt vinegar, barley malt flour and possibly bourbon (see “Beverages” below), as these typically contain gluten.
    • Soy sauce: Soy sauce is traditionally made with wheat, so it usually is not gluten-free unless otherwise marked.
    • Malt vinegar: Malt vinegar isn’t just a French-fry dipper. It’s also found in some salad dressings and sauces and it’s not gluten-free. However, white vinegar, distilled vinegar and apple-cider vinegar are all gluten-free.

Gluten-Free Desserts & Sweets

Many sweets and desserts are made with wheat flour or other ingredients with gluten. As more companies are making gluten-free versions of products, remember that gluten-free sweets are not necessarily healthier for you than regular treats, but they will prevent a bad reaction if you’re sensitive to gluten.

Make at Home

Sweets That Are Usually Safe:

  • Chocolate: Chocolate does not naturally contain gluten, though some manufacturers have add-ins that do contain gluten. There is also a risk of cross-contamination, so it’s best to check the label on chocolate.
    • Hard candy and gummies: These candies don’t usually don’t contain gluten; avoid those listing “wheat flour” as an ingredient.
    • Ice cream, sherbet, gelato, frozen yogurt: These treats are generally gluten-free, but steer clear of those with pretzels, cookie dough, graham crackers, brownie bites and other gluten-containing add-ins.

Sweets to Avoid:

  • Grain-based desserts: Cookies, cake, brownies, pie, doughnuts, pastries, cheesecake, etc. are almost always made with gluten, unless marked “gluten-free.” Even crustless cheesecakes and fruit desserts may have wheat flour in the filling.
    • Licorice: This sweet candy may be made with wheat flour and therefore is not gluten-free, unless otherwise noted on the packaging.
    • Barley malt: Avoid sweets made with this ingredient, which is used to sweeten some candies and chocolates.

Gluten-Free Drinks and Beverages

There are plenty of gluten-free beverages, but you do need to pay attention to be sure you don’t slip up with a sip of gluten. Water, of course, is naturally gluten-free and is your best healthy way to stay hydrated. For all prepared beverages, be sure to check the ingredients, as variations and blends may contain gluten.

Drinks and Beverages That Are Usually Safe:

 

  • Coffee and tea: These beverages are both naturally gluten-free, but if you’re sensitive to gluten it’s best to check and make sure there was no cross-contamination with your coffee beans or tea leaves, or added ingredients in blended beverages.
    • Juices, sodas and sports drinks: Check the label to be safe, but these generally won’t have added gluten-containing ingredients.

Drinks and Beverages That Need a Second Look:

  • Alcohol: Alcoholic beverages need to be navigated more carefully, as different varieties do contain gluten. Beer is made with hops, barley or rye—meaning it does have gluten and should be avoided, though many companies are coming out with gluten-free beer varieties. Cider is a good gluten-free alternative (it is made with fermented apples), as is wine, because it is made with grapes. Hard alcohol is generally safe: Those not made from grains, such as rum (made from sugarcane) and tequila (100-percent agave) are typically gluten-free. Other distilled alcohols (gin, whiskey, bourbon, vodka, etc.) may be made from grains, but the distilling process renders them gluten-free. However, reactions have been reported, so to be completely safe, experiment with a small amount or look for “gluten-free” labels.

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BRING SAUCY LOVE

IF YOU BRING ME SAUCE WITHOUT HAVING TO ASK, THEN I LOVE YOU…
There’s a part of Florida covered with wiry trees called Caribbean Pines. They thrive in really deadly environments. They stick out drought and fire, and hold their own against hurricanes. If trees were horror films these guys would have twenty sequels. In fact, if you plant them in the sort of setting trees should love, they’re so hardcore they just shrivel and die rather than live on like a normal tree.

When things get *too* comfortable, your relationship actually shrivels. The odd blast of wilderness can be genuinely good for it. Sometimes, then, relationships go through difficult times in order for us to see what’s in our heart – is it made of the good, solid stuff that trusts in what you saw in that person first – and to mature it, to chip away at the raw material of our life to get to the true and better person inside.
So when rough times look like they’re about to sweep in, bring it on!
What now?
Look back on the last three months. What hard times have you been brought through? What good things have come from them that couldn’t have happened otherwise? Hence this phase above – re-read it and you know what will jump start the love story.

Awww so sweeet
Make him or her love you more by heading over here
www.sweetmandarin.net

Destination: SAUCE

Destination : Sauce

When you decide to fly to a certain destination these things all have to work together: 1) you need to identify the right airline and flight schedule 2) the plane must operate on the route timetable 3) the airline has a set price to pay

Today as a humble sauce maker I ask you to be confident in the generations of crafting sauce is full of experience and that you will reach your destination safely. Put your trust in Sweet Mandarin a family of four generations, a sauce recipe legacy and the sauce maker and her trusted team from the Chilli farms to the couriers.

Head over to the sauce destination 

Top 10 Tips for a Gluten Free Diet

 

1. Get used to reading food labels when you shop.

2. Use gluten-free substitutes in place of gluten-containing foods

3. Remember lots of foods are naturally gluten-free

4. Enjoy naturally gluten-free grains and cereals.

5. Know which alcohol to avoid

6. Remember you can still enjoy meals out with family and friends

7. Be aware of cross contamination

8. Avoid sauces containing gluten

9. Experiment in the kitchen

10. Remember, gluten-free meals can be just as delicious and healthy too

SWEET MANDARIN LAUNCHES SUGAR FREE SAUCES

September 2017

SWEET MANDARIN LAUNCHES THREE SUGAR FREE SAUCES

Today, mums around the country are buzzing with the arrival of three new Sweet Mandarin® Sugar-free products. Sweet Mandarin is an award winning restaurant serving family recipes over three generations and also have their own line of gluten free Chinese sauces. They are now expanding the successful Sweet Mandarin sauce line with Sweet Mandarin Sweet and Sour Sugarfree sauce, Sweet Mandarin Barbecue Sugarfree sauce and Sweet Mandarin Sugarfree tomato sauce offering the flavours of high quality sauces which are still gluten free but with the tastes of sugar free respectively. Winning over new and existing consumers since 2012, Sweet Mandarin stand for taste and the leading gluten free and vegan choice. The line offers a delicious taste option for every palate whether new to the sauce category, or currently enjoying Sweet Mandarin while for those working, studying, working out or juggling the daily demands of life. The introduction of the Sweet Mandarin Sweet and Sour Sugarfree sauce, Sweet Mandarin Sugarfree tomato sauce and Sweet Mandarin Barbecue Sugarfree sauce now provide consumers and families with the additional choice of sugar content, especially for those looking for variety and sugar-free offerings. A resounding success last summer as the top selling new sauce item launched in 2016*, the limited edition Sweet Mandarin Nut Free Satay sauce is returning permanently as the Sweet Mandarin favourite for those who suffer nut allergies. The Sweet Mandarin Nut Free Satay has won two awards in the free-from awards and offers the taste of a satay without any peanuts.

The new products will be available nationwide online exclusively with a RRP of £3.59 Sweet Mandarin has won many accolades notably winning Gordon Ramsay’s F Word beating 10,000 Chinese restaurants and has the coveted AA Rosette. The sauces is available in 10 countries worldwide and the founders have cooked for highly esteemed guests such as David Cameron, Premier of China and many celebrities and billionaires. For more information, visit sweetmandarin.net

The range is available now, RRP £3.59 per bottle at Sweet Mandarin’s online shop www.sweetmandarin.net

– ends –

For further information, images, interviews or product samples, contact Sweet Mandarin for more details. Samples will be available

LISA TSE
SWEET MANDARIN
19 COPPERAS STREET
NORTHERN QUARTER
MANCHESTER
Sweetmandarinsauces@gmail.com
0161 832 8848
Lisa Tse at Sweet Mandarin
T: 0161 832 8848
E: sweetmandarinsauces@gmail.com

Gluten Free Diet – How to start?

The gluten free diet is the only treatment for the condition. On the gluten free diet you can eat manyfoods including meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, rice and potatoes. The gluten free diet is the only treatment for coeliac disease. Make your dishes more flavourful using the large range of Sweet Mandarin gluten free Chinese sauces

Gluten Free Diet

If you eat gluten-free, a gluten-free foods list can be a valuable resource. Navigating stores and restaurants to find gluten-free food options may be challenging at times. This gluten-free foods list can help you know what to look for (and what to look out for) when choosing grains and other foods that may contain gluten.

Currently, using a “gluten-free” label is optional on food products sold in the U.S. All products that are labeled “gluten-free” must contain less than 20 parts per million gluten. The 20 ppm threshold was set because it is virtually impossible to reliably detect levels below this (it’s like finding a grain of sand in a swimming pool). Plus, research shows that most people with celiac disease, an immune response to eating gluten, can handle these small (<20 ppm) amounts of gluten with no ill effects.

All food labeled “gluten-free” meets these standards, but not all gluten-free food is labeled (especially products that are naturally gluten-free). The ingredient list on the package label is your best tool to be sure, and you can always contact the food company directly if you’re unclear. Here are some things to look out for when you’re buying gluten-free foods.

Gluten-Free Whole Grains: Oats, Cereals, Breads and More

Grains (including bread, pasta, rice, crackers), specifically whole grains, are an important part of a healthy diet. Whole grains are a good source of healthy carbohydrates, providing energy to get you through the day. Most whole grains are high in fiber, which keeps you full and helps with digestion. Though many grains have gluten, a wide variety are naturally gluten-free.

Naturally Gluten-Free Grains & Starches:

  • Rice
    • Quinoa
    • Millet
    • Oats: But be aware that oats may be processed in a facility that also processes wheat. You’ll need to confirm your oats are labeled gluten-free or check with the manufacturer to rule out cross-contamination.
    • Cassava/Yuca
    • Sorghum
    • Teff
    • Corn
    • Buckwheat
    • Amaranth
    • Potatoes and potato flour

What to Avoid When Shopping for Grains:

If you’re not sure if your bread, crackers, pasta and other grain-based products are gluten-free, a quick look through the ingredients can help you tell. Avoid products that contain any of the following, as these are NOT gluten-free.

  • Wheat
    • Other forms/varieties of wheat that should also be avoided: whole wheat, spelt, wheat berries, kamut, durum, farro, farina, bulgur, graham, semolina, bromated flour • Barley
    • Rye
    • Triticale (a cross between rye and wheat)
    • Malt

Try Them: Healthy Gluten-Free Dinner Recipes

Gluten-Free Vegetables & Fruits

 

That’s right, gluten can even sneak into some of your fruits and veggies, though this is no reason to avoid them! All fresh, whole vegetables and fruits are naturally gluten-free and important to include in a gluten-free diet. Low in calories, fat and sodium and delivering a variety of vitamins and minerals, fruits and vegetables are a great source of antioxidants. Produce is also a top source of fiber, which can help lower cholesterol and keep you full.

But when you move out of the produce aisle and start looking at packaged produce, be wary. Some types of processed vegetables and fruits may be prepared or preserved with ingredients that contain gluten. Plain fresh and frozen (without sauce) vegetables are all gluten-free, but double-check ingredient lists on packages to be sure. When buying canned veggies, buy those packed with water or natural juices (typically the healthier option anyway). For dried and pre-prepped vegetables, double-check the ingredients to make sure there are no gluten-containing flavorings or stabilizers. The concern for gluten in fruit comes when fruit is canned, dried or (less likely but possible) frozen, as gluten-containing ingredients may be added during the process. Here’s what to look out for when selecting gluten-free fruit and vegetables.

What to Avoid When Shopping for Fruits and Vegetables:

  • Hydrolyzed wheat protein
    • Modified food starch: If the label doesn’t specify what type of starch is used, check with the manufacturer, as it may be wheat.
    • Malt: Including malt syrup, malt vinegar, malt extract, malt flavoring
    • Gluten stabilizer
    • Maltodextrin: This is OK when made from corn, potato or rice starch. If it’s made from wheat, it will be labeled: you may have a reaction, though many claim the gluten is destroyed in processing.

Safe Ingredients:

  • Cornstarch
    • Potato starch/potato starch flour
    • Distilled vinegar
    • Mono- and diglycerides
    • Oat gum
    • Citric acid, lactic acid and malic acid

Gluten-Free Proteins

 

Most protein sources—both animal and vegetable proteins—are naturally gluten-free. Additional ingredients, such as fillers and flavor enhancers (including spices, rubs and sauces) are where gluten can sneak into your meats and veggie proteins. Use this list to help you decide which proteins can fit into a gluten-free diet.

Naturally Gluten-Free Proteins:

  • Red meat: Fresh beef, pork, lamb, goat, bison, duck, etc. (Check any marinades.)
    • Poultry: Fresh chicken and turkey (Check any marinades.)
    • Seafood: Fresh fish, scallops, lobster, clams and more are all naturally gluten-free. (Check any marinades.)
    • Tofu: It’s made from soy, which is gluten-free, but check for any additional ingredients with gluten.
    • Beans
    • Nuts and seeds

Proteins That Need a Second Look:

  • Processed meats: Including hot dogs, pepperoni, sausage, etc. These may have gluten added, so be sure to check the ingredient list and avoid those with wheat gluten, wheat starch or wheat dextrin.
    • Cold cuts: It’s rare, but cold cuts may have gluten-containing ingredients added; cross-contamination can also happen at the deli on the meat slicer.
    • Ground meat: Ground beef or ground turkey can have gluten added in as filler. Be sure to check the ingredients carefully.
    • Vegetarian burgers and other meat substitutes: Some flavors and brands are made with ingredients that contain gluten. Be sure to check the labels.

Proteins to Avoid:

 

  • Seitan: This vegetarian protein is literally gluten. So avoid this if you’re following a gluten-free diet.

Don’t Miss: Vegetarian Gluten-Free Recipes to Try

Gluten-Free Sauces, Spices and Condiments

Sauces are one of the most common places gluten slips in unnoticed. Gluten-containing ingredients can be used as thickeners, stabilizers or flavor enhancers in many common condiments. Wheat flour is a common thickener in many sauces and marinades, which means they contain gluten. Be aware of the following sources of gluten that may not be super-obvious. And also watch out for cross-contamination once these items are in your home. For example, a knife used to spread mustard on wheat bread shouldn’t be dipped back into the mustard jar if you want it to stay gluten-free.

Sauces, Spices and Condiments That Are Usually Safe:

  • Mustard: Some specialty or flavored mustards may contain gluten, so always check the ingredients.
    • Mayonnaise: Typically not made with gluten, but check the ingredients to be sure.
    • Dry spices: Most single-ingredient herbs and spices (think dried basil, garlic powder, chili powder) do not contain gluten, though because of cross-contamination concerns it’s best to look for specifically labeled gluten-free spices or check with the manufacturer.

Sauces, Spices and Condiments That Need a Second Look:

  • Ketchup and Worcestershire sauce: Both of these condiments can be made using malt vinegar, which is not gluten-free. Double-check the ingredients.
    • Barbecue sauce: Avoid BBQ sauces made with barley-based beer, soy sauce, malt vinegar, barley malt flour and possibly bourbon (see “Beverages” below), as these typically contain gluten.
    • Soy sauce: Soy sauce is traditionally made with wheat, so it usually is not gluten-free unless otherwise marked.
    • Malt vinegar: Malt vinegar isn’t just a French-fry dipper. It’s also found in some salad dressings and sauces and it’s not gluten-free. However, white vinegar, distilled vinegar and apple-cider vinegar are all gluten-free.

Gluten-Free Desserts & Sweets

Many sweets and desserts are made with wheat flour or other ingredients with gluten. As more companies are making gluten-free versions of products, remember that gluten-free sweets are not necessarily healthier for you than regular treats, but they will prevent a bad reaction if you’re sensitive to gluten.

Make at Home: Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes

Sweets That Are Usually Safe:

  • Chocolate: Chocolate does not naturally contain gluten, though some manufacturers have add-ins that do contain gluten. There is also a risk of cross-contamination, so it’s best to check the label on chocolate.
    • Hard candy and gummies: These candies don’t usually don’t contain gluten; avoid those listing “wheat flour” as an ingredient.
    • Ice cream, sherbet, gelato, frozen yogurt: These treats are generally gluten-free, but steer clear of those with pretzels, cookie dough, graham crackers, brownie bites and other gluten-containing add-ins.

Sweets to Avoid:

  • Grain-based desserts: Cookies, cake, brownies, pie, doughnuts, pastries, cheesecake, etc. are almost always made with gluten, unless marked “gluten-free.” Even crustless cheesecakes and fruit desserts may have wheat flour in the filling.
    • Licorice: This sweet candy may be made with wheat flour and therefore is not gluten-free, unless otherwise noted on the packaging.
    • Barley malt: Avoid sweets made with this ingredient, which is used to sweeten some candies and chocolates.

Gluten-Free Drinks and Beverages

There are plenty of gluten-free beverages, but you do need to pay attention to be sure you don’t slip up with a sip of gluten. Water, of course, is naturally gluten-free and is your best healthy way to stay hydrated. For all prepared beverages, be sure to check the ingredients, as variations and blends may contain gluten.

Drinks and Beverages That Are Usually Safe:

 

  • Coffee and tea: These beverages are both naturally gluten-free, but if you’re sensitive to gluten it’s best to check and make sure there was no cross-contamination with your coffee beans or tea leaves, or added ingredients in blended beverages.
    • Juices, sodas and sports drinks: Check the label to be safe, but these generally won’t have added gluten-containing ingredients.

Drinks and Beverages That Need a Second Look:

  • Alcohol: Alcoholic beverages need to be navigated more carefully, as different varieties do contain gluten. Beer is made with hops, barley or rye—meaning it does have gluten and should be avoided, though many companies are coming out with gluten-free beer varieties. Cider is a good gluten-free alternative (it is made with fermented apples), as is wine, because it is made with grapes. Hard alcohol is generally safe: Those not made from grains, such as rum (made from sugarcane) and tequila (100-percent agave) are typically gluten-free. Other distilled alcohols (gin, whiskey, bourbon, vodka, etc.) may be made from grains, but the distilling process renders them gluten-free. However, reactions have been reported, so to be completely safe, experiment with a small amount or look for “gluten-free” labels.

Gluten-Free Diet

If you eat gluten-free, a gluten-free foods list can be a valuable resource. Navigating stores and restaurants to find gluten-free food options may be challenging at times. This gluten-free foods list can help you know what to look for (and what to look out for) when choosing grains and other foods that may contain gluten.

Currently, using a “gluten-free” label is optional on food products sold in the U.S. All products that are labeled “gluten-free” must contain less than 20 parts per million gluten. The 20 ppm threshold was set because it is virtually impossible to reliably detect levels below this (it’s like finding a grain of sand in a swimming pool). Plus, research shows that most people with celiac disease, an immune response to eating gluten, can handle these small (<20 ppm) amounts of gluten with no ill effects.

All food labeled “gluten-free” meets these standards, but not all gluten-free food is labeled (especially products that are naturally gluten-free). The ingredient list on the package label is your best tool to be sure, and you can always contact the food company directly if you’re unclear. Here are some things to look out for when you’re buying gluten-free foods.

Gluten-Free Whole Grains: Oats, Cereals, Breads and More

Grains (including bread, pasta, rice, crackers), specifically whole grains, are an important part of a healthy diet. Whole grains are a good source of healthy carbohydrates, providing energy to get you through the day. Most whole grains are high in fiber, which keeps you full and helps with digestion. Though many grains have gluten, a wide variety are naturally gluten-free.

Naturally Gluten-Free Grains & Starches:

  • Rice
    • Quinoa
    • Millet
    • Oats: But be aware that oats may be processed in a facility that also processes wheat. You’ll need to confirm your oats are labeled gluten-free or check with the manufacturer to rule out cross-contamination.
    • Cassava/Yuca
    • Sorghum
    • Teff
    • Corn
    • Buckwheat
    • Amaranth
    • Potatoes and potato flour

What to Avoid When Shopping for Grains:

If you’re not sure if your bread, crackers, pasta and other grain-based products are gluten-free, a quick look through the ingredients can help you tell. Avoid products that contain any of the following, as these are NOT gluten-free.

  • Wheat
    • Other forms/varieties of wheat that should also be avoided: whole wheat, spelt, wheat berries, kamut, durum, farro, farina, bulgur, graham, semolina, bromated flour • Barley
    • Rye
    • Triticale (a cross between rye and wheat)
    • Malt

Try Them: Healthy Gluten-Free Dinner Recipes

Gluten-Free Vegetables & Fruits

 

That’s right, gluten can even sneak into some of your fruits and veggies, though this is no reason to avoid them! All fresh, whole vegetables and fruits are naturally gluten-free and important to include in a gluten-free diet. Low in calories, fat and sodium and delivering a variety of vitamins and minerals, fruits and vegetables are a great source of antioxidants. Produce is also a top source of fiber, which can help lower cholesterol and keep you full.

But when you move out of the produce aisle and start looking at packaged produce, be wary. Some types of processed vegetables and fruits may be prepared or preserved with ingredients that contain gluten. Plain fresh and frozen (without sauce) vegetables are all gluten-free, but double-check ingredient lists on packages to be sure. When buying canned veggies, buy those packed with water or natural juices (typically the healthier option anyway). For dried and pre-prepped vegetables, double-check the ingredients to make sure there are no gluten-containing flavorings or stabilizers. The concern for gluten in fruit comes when fruit is canned, dried or (less likely but possible) frozen, as gluten-containing ingredients may be added during the process. Here’s what to look out for when selecting gluten-free fruit and vegetables.

What to Avoid When Shopping for Fruits and Vegetables:

  • Hydrolyzed wheat protein
    • Modified food starch: If the label doesn’t specify what type of starch is used, check with the manufacturer, as it may be wheat.
    • Malt: Including malt syrup, malt vinegar, malt extract, malt flavoring
    • Gluten stabilizer
    • Maltodextrin: This is OK when made from corn, potato or rice starch. If it’s made from wheat, it will be labeled: you may have a reaction, though many claim the gluten is destroyed in processing.

Safe Ingredients:

  • Cornstarch
    • Potato starch/potato starch flour
    • Distilled vinegar
    • Mono- and diglycerides
    • Oat gum
    • Citric acid, lactic acid and malic acid

Gluten-Free Proteins

 

Most protein sources—both animal and vegetable proteins—are naturally gluten-free. Additional ingredients, such as fillers and flavor enhancers (including spices, rubs and sauces) are where gluten can sneak into your meats and veggie proteins. Use this list to help you decide which proteins can fit into a gluten-free diet.

Naturally Gluten-Free Proteins:

  • Red meat: Fresh beef, pork, lamb, goat, bison, duck, etc. (Check any marinades.)
    • Poultry: Fresh chicken and turkey (Check any marinades.)
    • Seafood: Fresh fish, scallops, lobster, clams and more are all naturally gluten-free. (Check any marinades.)
    • Tofu: It’s made from soy, which is gluten-free, but check for any additional ingredients with gluten.
    • Beans
    • Nuts and seeds

Proteins That Need a Second Look:

  • Processed meats: Including hot dogs, pepperoni, sausage, etc. These may have gluten added, so be sure to check the ingredient list and avoid those with wheat gluten, wheat starch or wheat dextrin.
    • Cold cuts: It’s rare, but cold cuts may have gluten-containing ingredients added; cross-contamination can also happen at the deli on the meat slicer.
    • Ground meat: Ground beef or ground turkey can have gluten added in as filler. Be sure to check the ingredients carefully.
    • Vegetarian burgers and other meat substitutes: Some flavors and brands are made with ingredients that contain gluten. Be sure to check the labels.

Proteins to Avoid:

 

  • Seitan: This vegetarian protein is literally gluten. So avoid this if you’re following a gluten-free diet.

Don’t Miss: Vegetarian Gluten-Free Recipes to Try

Gluten-Free Sauces, Spices and Condiments

Sauces are one of the most common places gluten slips in unnoticed. Gluten-containing ingredients can be used as thickeners, stabilizers or flavor enhancers in many common condiments. Wheat flour is a common thickener in many sauces and marinades, which means they contain gluten. Be aware of the following sources of gluten that may not be super-obvious. And also watch out for cross-contamination once these items are in your home. For example, a knife used to spread mustard on wheat bread shouldn’t be dipped back into the mustard jar if you want it to stay gluten-free.

Sauces, Spices and Condiments That Are Usually Safe:

  • Mustard: Some specialty or flavored mustards may contain gluten, so always check the ingredients.
    • Mayonnaise: Typically not made with gluten, but check the ingredients to be sure.
    • Dry spices: Most single-ingredient herbs and spices (think dried basil, garlic powder, chili powder) do not contain gluten, though because of cross-contamination concerns it’s best to look for specifically labeled gluten-free spices or check with the manufacturer.

Sauces, Spices and Condiments That Need a Second Look:

  • Ketchup and Worcestershire sauce: Both of these condiments can be made using malt vinegar, which is not gluten-free. Double-check the ingredients.
    • Barbecue sauce: Avoid BBQ sauces made with barley-based beer, soy sauce, malt vinegar, barley malt flour and possibly bourbon (see “Beverages” below), as these typically contain gluten.
    • Soy sauce: Soy sauce is traditionally made with wheat, so it usually is not gluten-free unless otherwise marked.
    • Malt vinegar: Malt vinegar isn’t just a French-fry dipper. It’s also found in some salad dressings and sauces and it’s not gluten-free. However, white vinegar, distilled vinegar and apple-cider vinegar are all gluten-free.

Gluten-Free Desserts & Sweets

Many sweets and desserts are made with wheat flour or other ingredients with gluten. As more companies are making gluten-free versions of products, remember that gluten-free sweets are not necessarily healthier for you than regular treats, but they will prevent a bad reaction if you’re sensitive to gluten.

Make at Home: Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes

Sweets That Are Usually Safe:

  • Chocolate: Chocolate does not naturally contain gluten, though some manufacturers have add-ins that do contain gluten. There is also a risk of cross-contamination, so it’s best to check the label on chocolate.
    • Hard candy and gummies: These candies don’t usually don’t contain gluten; avoid those listing “wheat flour” as an ingredient.
    • Ice cream, sherbet, gelato, frozen yogurt: These treats are generally gluten-free, but steer clear of those with pretzels, cookie dough, graham crackers, brownie bites and other gluten-containing add-ins.

Sweets to Avoid:

  • Grain-based desserts: Cookies, cake, brownies, pie, doughnuts, pastries, cheesecake, etc. are almost always made with gluten, unless marked “gluten-free.” Even crustless cheesecakes and fruit desserts may have wheat flour in the filling.
    • Licorice: This sweet candy may be made with wheat flour and therefore is not gluten-free, unless otherwise noted on the packaging.
    • Barley malt: Avoid sweets made with this ingredient, which is used to sweeten some candies and chocolates.

Gluten-Free Drinks and Beverages

There are plenty of gluten-free beverages, but you do need to pay attention to be sure you don’t slip up with a sip of gluten. Water, of course, is naturally gluten-free and is your best healthy way to stay hydrated. For all prepared beverages, be sure to check the ingredients, as variations and blends may contain gluten.

Drinks and Beverages That Are Usually Safe:

 

  • Coffee and tea: These beverages are both naturally gluten-free, but if you’re sensitive to gluten it’s best to check and make sure there was no cross-contamination with your coffee beans or tea leaves, or added ingredients in blended beverages.
    • Juices, sodas and sports drinks: Check the label to be safe, but these generally won’t have added gluten-containing ingredients.

Drinks and Beverages That Need a Second Look:

  • Alcohol: Alcoholic beverages need to be navigated more carefully, as different varieties do contain gluten. Beer is made with hops, barley or rye—meaning it does have gluten and should be avoided, though many companies are coming out with gluten-free beer varieties. Cider is a good gluten-free alternative (it is made with fermented apples), as is wine, because it is made with grapes. Hard alcohol is generally safe: Those not made from grains, such as rum (made from sugarcane) and tequila (100-percent agave) are typically gluten-free. Other distilled alcohols (gin, whiskey, bourbon, vodka, etc.) may be made from grains, but the distilling process renders them gluten-free. However, reactions have been reported, so to be completely safe, experiment with a small amount or look for “gluten-free” labels.

Gluten Free Diet

If you eat gluten-free, a gluten-free foods list can be a valuable resource. Navigating stores and restaurants to find gluten-free food options may be challenging at times. This gluten-free foods list can help you know what to look for (and what to look out for) when choosing grains and other foods that may contain gluten.

Currently, using a “gluten-free” label is optional on food products sold in the U.S. All products that are labeled “gluten-free” must contain less than 20 parts per million gluten. The 20 ppm threshold was set because it is virtually impossible to reliably detect levels below this (it’s like finding a grain of sand in a swimming pool). Plus, research shows that most people with celiac disease, an immune response to eating gluten, can handle these small (<20 ppm) amounts of gluten with no ill effects.

All food labeled “gluten-free” meets these standards, but not all gluten-free food is labeled (especially products that are naturally gluten-free). The ingredient list on the package label is your best tool to be sure, and you can always contact the food company directly if you’re unclear. Here are some things to look out for when you’re buying gluten-free foods.

Gluten-Free Whole Grains: Oats, Cereals, Breads and More

Grains (including bread, pasta, rice, crackers), specifically whole grains, are an important part of a healthy diet. Whole grains are a good source of healthy carbohydrates, providing energy to get you through the day. Most whole grains are high in fiber, which keeps you full and helps with digestion. Though many grains have gluten, a wide variety are naturally gluten-free.

Naturally Gluten-Free Grains & Starches:

  • Rice
    • Quinoa
    • Millet
    • Oats: But be aware that oats may be processed in a facility that also processes wheat. You’ll need to confirm your oats are labeled gluten-free or check with the manufacturer to rule out cross-contamination.
    • Cassava/Yuca
    • Sorghum
    • Teff
    • Corn
    • Buckwheat
    • Amaranth
    • Potatoes and potato flour

What to Avoid When Shopping for Grains:

If you’re not sure if your bread, crackers, pasta and other grain-based products are gluten-free, a quick look through the ingredients can help you tell. Avoid products that contain any of the following, as these are NOT gluten-free.

  • Wheat
    • Other forms/varieties of wheat that should also be avoided: whole wheat, spelt, wheat berries, kamut, durum, farro, farina, bulgur, graham, semolina, bromated flour • Barley
    • Rye
    • Triticale (a cross between rye and wheat)
    • Malt

Try Them: Healthy Gluten-Free Dinner Recipes

Gluten-Free Vegetables & Fruits

 

That’s right, gluten can even sneak into some of your fruits and veggies, though this is no reason to avoid them! All fresh, whole vegetables and fruits are naturally gluten-free and important to include in a gluten-free diet. Low in calories, fat and sodium and delivering a variety of vitamins and minerals, fruits and vegetables are a great source of antioxidants. Produce is also a top source of fiber, which can help lower cholesterol and keep you full.

But when you move out of the produce aisle and start looking at packaged produce, be wary. Some types of processed vegetables and fruits may be prepared or preserved with ingredients that contain gluten. Plain fresh and frozen (without sauce) vegetables are all gluten-free, but double-check ingredient lists on packages to be sure. When buying canned veggies, buy those packed with water or natural juices (typically the healthier option anyway). For dried and pre-prepped vegetables, double-check the ingredients to make sure there are no gluten-containing flavorings or stabilizers. The concern for gluten in fruit comes when fruit is canned, dried or (less likely but possible) frozen, as gluten-containing ingredients may be added during the process. Here’s what to look out for when selecting gluten-free fruit and vegetables.

What to Avoid When Shopping for Fruits and Vegetables:

  • Hydrolyzed wheat protein
    • Modified food starch: If the label doesn’t specify what type of starch is used, check with the manufacturer, as it may be wheat.
    • Malt: Including malt syrup, malt vinegar, malt extract, malt flavoring
    • Gluten stabilizer
    • Maltodextrin: This is OK when made from corn, potato or rice starch. If it’s made from wheat, it will be labeled: you may have a reaction, though many claim the gluten is destroyed in processing.

Safe Ingredients:

  • Cornstarch
    • Potato starch/potato starch flour
    • Distilled vinegar
    • Mono- and diglycerides
    • Oat gum
    • Citric acid, lactic acid and malic acid

Gluten-Free Proteins

 

Most protein sources—both animal and vegetable proteins—are naturally gluten-free. Additional ingredients, such as fillers and flavor enhancers (including spices, rubs and sauces) are where gluten can sneak into your meats and veggie proteins. Use this list to help you decide which proteins can fit into a gluten-free diet.

Naturally Gluten-Free Proteins:

  • Red meat: Fresh beef, pork, lamb, goat, bison, duck, etc. (Check any marinades.)
    • Poultry: Fresh chicken and turkey (Check any marinades.)
    • Seafood: Fresh fish, scallops, lobster, clams and more are all naturally gluten-free. (Check any marinades.)
    • Tofu: It’s made from soy, which is gluten-free, but check for any additional ingredients with gluten.
    • Beans
    • Nuts and seeds

Proteins That Need a Second Look:

  • Processed meats: Including hot dogs, pepperoni, sausage, etc. These may have gluten added, so be sure to check the ingredient list and avoid those with wheat gluten, wheat starch or wheat dextrin.
    • Cold cuts: It’s rare, but cold cuts may have gluten-containing ingredients added; cross-contamination can also happen at the deli on the meat slicer.
    • Ground meat: Ground beef or ground turkey can have gluten added in as filler. Be sure to check the ingredients carefully.
    • Vegetarian burgers and other meat substitutes: Some flavors and brands are made with ingredients that contain gluten. Be sure to check the labels.

Proteins to Avoid:

 

  • Seitan: This vegetarian protein is literally gluten. So avoid this if you’re following a gluten-free diet.

Don’t Miss: Vegetarian Gluten-Free Recipes to Try

Gluten-Free Sauces, Spices and Condiments

Sauces are one of the most common places gluten slips in unnoticed. Gluten-containing ingredients can be used as thickeners, stabilizers or flavor enhancers in many common condiments. Wheat flour is a common thickener in many sauces and marinades, which means they contain gluten. Be aware of the following sources of gluten that may not be super-obvious. And also watch out for cross-contamination once these items are in your home. For example, a knife used to spread mustard on wheat bread shouldn’t be dipped back into the mustard jar if you want it to stay gluten-free.

Sauces, Spices and Condiments That Are Usually Safe:

  • Mustard: Some specialty or flavored mustards may contain gluten, so always check the ingredients.
    • Mayonnaise: Typically not made with gluten, but check the ingredients to be sure.
    • Dry spices: Most single-ingredient herbs and spices (think dried basil, garlic powder, chili powder) do not contain gluten, though because of cross-contamination concerns it’s best to look for specifically labeled gluten-free spices or check with the manufacturer.

Sauces, Spices and Condiments That Need a Second Look:

  • Ketchup and Worcestershire sauce: Both of these condiments can be made using malt vinegar, which is not gluten-free. Double-check the ingredients.
    • Barbecue sauce: Avoid BBQ sauces made with barley-based beer, soy sauce, malt vinegar, barley malt flour and possibly bourbon (see “Beverages” below), as these typically contain gluten.
    • Soy sauce: Soy sauce is traditionally made with wheat, so it usually is not gluten-free unless otherwise marked.
    • Malt vinegar: Malt vinegar isn’t just a French-fry dipper. It’s also found in some salad dressings and sauces and it’s not gluten-free. However, white vinegar, distilled vinegar and apple-cider vinegar are all gluten-free.

Gluten-Free Desserts & Sweets

Many sweets and desserts are made with wheat flour or other ingredients with gluten. As more companies are making gluten-free versions of products, remember that gluten-free sweets are not necessarily healthier for you than regular treats, but they will prevent a bad reaction if you’re sensitive to gluten.

Make at Home: Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes

Sweets That Are Usually Safe:

  • Chocolate: Chocolate does not naturally contain gluten, though some manufacturers have add-ins that do contain gluten. There is also a risk of cross-contamination, so it’s best to check the label on chocolate.
    • Hard candy and gummies: These candies don’t usually don’t contain gluten; avoid those listing “wheat flour” as an ingredient.
    • Ice cream, sherbet, gelato, frozen yogurt: These treats are generally gluten-free, but steer clear of those with pretzels, cookie dough, graham crackers, brownie bites and other gluten-containing add-ins.

Sweets to Avoid:

  • Grain-based desserts: Cookies, cake, brownies, pie, doughnuts, pastries, cheesecake, etc. are almost always made with gluten, unless marked “gluten-free.” Even crustless cheesecakes and fruit desserts may have wheat flour in the filling.
    • Licorice: This sweet candy may be made with wheat flour and therefore is not gluten-free, unless otherwise noted on the packaging.
    • Barley malt: Avoid sweets made with this ingredient, which is used to sweeten some candies and chocolates.

Gluten-Free Drinks and Beverages

There are plenty of gluten-free beverages, but you do need to pay attention to be sure you don’t slip up with a sip of gluten. Water, of course, is naturally gluten-free and is your best healthy way to stay hydrated. For all prepared beverages, be sure to check the ingredients, as variations and blends may contain gluten.

Drinks and Beverages That Are Usually Safe:

 

  • Coffee and tea: These beverages are both naturally gluten-free, but if you’re sensitive to gluten it’s best to check and make sure there was no cross-contamination with your coffee beans or tea leaves, or added ingredients in blended beverages.
    • Juices, sodas and sports drinks: Check the label to be safe, but these generally won’t have added gluten-containing ingredients.

Drinks and Beverages That Need a Second Look:

  • Alcohol: Alcoholic beverages need to be navigated more carefully, as different varieties do contain gluten. Beer is made with hops, barley or rye—meaning it does have gluten and should be avoided, though many companies are coming out with gluten-free beer varieties. Cider is a good gluten-free alternative (it is made with fermented apples), as is wine, because it is made with grapes. Hard alcohol is generally safe: Those not made from grains, such as rum (made from sugarcane) and tequila (100-percent agave) are typically gluten-free. Other distilled alcohols (gin, whiskey, bourbon, vodka, etc.) may be made from grains, but the distilling process renders them gluten-free. However, reactions have been reported, so to be completely safe, experiment with a small amount or look for “gluten-free” labels.